Archive

December 2011 Monthly Meeting

Time: 
Dec 6 2011 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Meeting Title: 

Optimizing performance in Commercial Fenestration

Location: 

University of Oregon-Portland
White Stag Building
70 NW Couch, Room 142/144

Presenters: 

Michael Gainey, Azon USA

Description: 

December’s presentation will outline two technologies related to high performance glazing. Speaker Michael Gainey, from Azon USA in MI, will discuss structural thermal barriers for aluminum window framing, and warm-edge spacer technology for insulating glass.

Michael Gainey is a 25-year veteran in the architectural and structural glazing industry working on both large and small projects across North America. He is a member of the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) and serves on committees of the Glass Association of North America (GANA), as well as the Insulating Glass Manufacturer's Association (IGMA). Mike is a frequent speaker at building enclosure councils and provides informative technical seminars regarding structural thermal barrier technology for high performance architectural aluminum fenestration and glazing. His project involvement includes several sustainable buildings in North America such as Vancouver’s Living Shangri-La, Toronto’s 18 York Street, and New York’s MoMA.

November 2011 Monthly Meeting

Time: 
Nov 1 2011 - 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Meeting Title: 

Application of Spray Foam Insulation

Location: 

University of Oregon-Portland
White Stag Building
70 NW Couch, Room 142/144

Presenters: 

Mac Sheldon, Demilec USA

Description: 

Mac Sheldon will present information on the use of spray foam insulation. He will focus on design considerations pertinent to thermal performance and evolving energy codes.

Spray foam insulation provides the opportunity to contribute to the thermal barrier, air barrier, and moisture barrier of envelope assemblies. However, it also presents challenges for proper design and installation. Topics will be examined relating the use of open and closed cell spray foam and methods for installation and common applications for wall and roof assemblies.

Mac Sheldon sits on the Board of Directors for the Spray Polyurethane Foam Alliance (SPFA) and the Codes and Standards committee for the Center for the Polyurethane Industry (CPI). He is currently on the Technical Oversight Committee for SPFA and the Industry Advisory Council for the Cold Climate Housing Research Center in Fairbanks. He is certified in WUFI, WUFI 2-D, and WUFI-Plus, as well as HERS (RESNET).

October 2011 Monthly Meeting

Time: 
Oct 4 2011 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Meeting Title: 

Envelope Consultants Panel 2 of 2

Location: 

University of Oregon-Portland
White Stag Building
70 NW Couch, Room 142/144

Presenters: 

Sean Scott

Dick Burnum, Hoffman Construction

Randy Miller, Portland Public Schools

Isaac Tevit, Ankrom Moisan Architects

Description: 

The second of two BEC presentations for this year focusing on what project specific conditions warrant using an enclosure consultant and what conditions do not warrant inclusion of an enclosure consultant. The first panel discussion focused on the working relationship setup and strategies, and the second panel discussion (October 2011) focuses on working management and roles.

The subject matter of both panel discussions is decided on every project, even if it's by default in replicating past similar project decisions. Thus, hearing from various industry partners on this topic is pertinent.

The panel is balanced on this topic and audience participation via questions and comments is encouraged throughout. Please arrive with questions for the panel. The learning objectives below will form the initial questions for the panel members to start the discussion. The intent of this discussion is not to change viewpoints or debate. Instead, the intent is to have a discussion on a topic that numerous Architecture firms are currently discussing on most projects.

Alternative tools and strategies when enclosure consultants are not engaged will be explored as well as tools to maximize project value if enclosure consultants are engaged.

September 2011 Monthly Meeting

Time: 
Sep 6 2011 - 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Meeting Title: 

Using an Enclosure Consultant, Part 1: Working Relationship Setup and Strategies

Location: 

University of Oregon-Portland
White Stag Building
70 NW Couch, Room 142/144

Presenters: 

Sean Scott, AIA

Marty Houston, AIA

Dennis Wilde

Charles Dorne

Description: 

The first two BEC presentations for this year focus upon what project specific conditions warrant using an enclosure consultant and what conditions do not warrant inclusion of an enclosure consultant. The first panel discussion focuses more upon the working relationship setup and strategies, and the second panel discussion (October 2011) focuses more on the working management and roles.

The subject matter of both panel discussions is decided on every project, even if it's by default in replicating past similar project decisions. Thus, hearing from various industry partners on this topic is pertinent.

The panel is balanced on this topic and audience participation via questions and comments is encouraged throughout.  Please arrive with questions for the panel. The learning objectives below will form the initial questions for the panel members to start the discussion.  The intent of this discussion is not to change viewpoints or debate.  Instead, the intent is to have a discussion on a topic that numerous Architecture firms are currently discussing on most projects.

Alternative tools and strategies when enclosure consultants are not engaged will be explored as well as tools to maximize project value if enclosure consultants are engaged.

Download http://pdx-string.uoregon.edu/webcast_files/Sept_06_2011.wmv

June 2011 Monthly Meeting

Time: 
Jun 7 2011 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Meeting Title: 

Liquid Flashing and EFVM

Location: 

University of Oregon-Portland
White Stag Building
70 NW Couch, Room 142/144

Presenters: 

Mike Schilling from Snyder Roofing

Hosted Webcast

Time: 
May 19 2011 - 11:00am - 12:30pm
Meeting Title: 

Designing Energy Efficient Buildings and Building Enclosures: Energy Modeling as a Tool

Location: 

University of Oregon-Portland
White Stag Building
70 NW Couch, Room 142/144

Presenters: 

Eric Oliver, PE, CEM, LEEDap

Description: 

The Portland BEC is hosting a local broadcast of this nationally sponsored webcast by BETEC/NIBS and AIA. 

Portland BEC Members: free, plus BEC will submit your name for AIA CEU credits Non-members: $15 at the door Lunch will be provided for the first 30 attendees.

For more information

from the course description Program Information

The use of energy modeling has increased significantly due to the growing popularity of the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) program. The LEED program, developed by the US Green Building Council (www.usgbc.org), encourages sustainable and energy efficient design, which is determined by comparing an energy model of the building's design with a model of the same building built to ASHRAE 90.1 minimal efficiency requirements. Although performing a model is required for LEED buildings, it is a strategy that should be used in all building designs, to ensure the best decisions are being made regarding energy efficiency.

Incorporating energy efficiency into building design may be the strategy that provides the best return on investment in the entire process. Efficiency can have a much greater impact during the design process for new construction than in existing buildings, since annual savings are compared to incremental increases in cost, rather than whole replacement costs. Many smart design strategies don't result in any additional up front costs. For example, if you start with a standard building design, and decide to make an investment in high-efficiency windows, you may spend a small incremental additional cost up front. However energy efficient windows, in addition to reducing energy consumption, also reduce the peak cooling and heating loads, therefore the cooling and heating system could potentially be downsized. In many cases, the incremental costs for high performance windows are more than offset by lower initial central plant costs, resulting in a net reduced first cost.

Energy Simulation modeling should be integrated in the very early stages of schematic design. Using default assumptions for mechanical systems and building envelope characteristics, you can run a simulation with different orientations of the building to determine the one with the lowest predicted energy costs. Once this has been determined, similar types of analyses can be run comparing different wall types, window configurations, roof types, and even design characteristics such as window overhangs and skylights. During Design Development, the energy model can be used to quantify savings from strategies like daylighting control, window characteristics, shading devices, and air supply strategies such as demand controlled ventilation. Since all buildings have a limited budget, the ability to quantify energy savings from design strategies, compared to the incremental costs, can show where the biggest "bang for the buck" can be found.

About the Speaker

Mr. Eric Oliver, PE, CEM, LEEDAP, President, EMO Energy Solutions

Mr. Oliver is founder and president of EMO Energy Solutions. He is a Professional Engineer licensed in Virginia and Maryland, a Certified Energy Manager (CEM), Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) 2.0 accredited professional, and Certified Home Energy Rater with over 20 years of energy and utility management experience specializing in demand side management, energy audits, facility assessments, and energy simulation modeling with experience in the private, utility, and government sectors. He is responsible for managing domestic and international projects by conducting and overseeing a number of analyses, including facility energy and utility assessments and conservation and energy purchasing options.

He has also conducted energy training seminars, developed energy awareness and education campaigns, and has been a presenter and moderator at several energy conferences. His past experience includes comprehensive energy audits, energy modeling, utility rebate program analysis, technology feasibility studies, cost-benefit analysis, public-private partnerships, and development of energy conservation strategies and policies. He has served as Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Virginia Sustainable Building Network, Executive Committee Secretary of the Association of Energy Engineers, President of the National Capital Chapter of the Association of Energy Engineers, and a member of the Founding Board of Directors of the Washington DC Chapter of the US Green Buildings Council. Eric was recently named SmartCEO magazine's Eco CEO of the year for Small Businesses.

May 2011 Monthly Meeting

Time: 
May 3 2011 - 12:00am - 1:00pm
Meeting Title: 

Osmosis and Blistering of Polyurethane Waterproofing Membranes

Location: 

University of Oregon-Portland
White Stag Building
70 NW Couch, Room 142/144

Presenters: 

David Young, PE

Description: 

This month our Portland BEC President, Dave Young, will present information on blistering in polyurethane membranes.

Water-filled blisters under cold-applied, asphalt-modified elastomeric polyurethane waterproofing membranes have been discovered on numerous buildings in the Pacific Northwest in recent years, often requiring replacement of the membrane. This presentation explains the phenomena of osmotic flow through polyurethane waterproofing membranes and presents strategies for addressing this problem through design.

Mr. Young has focused his career on building enclosure consulting over the past 21 years. His experience includes low to high-rise commercial, institutional, and multi-family residential buildings. Dave is a licensed professional engineer in Oregon and has a Bachelor degree in civil engineering from Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. He is a principal of RDH Building Sciences, Inc.

April 2011 Monthly Meeting

Time: 
Apr 5 2011 - 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Meeting Title: 

Application of Continuous Insulation in Walls for 2010 Oregon Energy Code

Location: 

University of Oregon-Portland
White Stag Building
70 NW Couch, Room 142/144

Presenters: 

Mark Campion

Description: 

This month Mark Campion will present information on the application of continuous insulation in walls per the 2010 Oregon Energy Code requirement.

The 2010 Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code introduced a new prescriptive requirement for thermal envelope performance, continuous insulation. Continuous insulation requires special consideration in its installation. Designers and contractors in Oregon have little experience with the design and installation of continuous insulation. The intent of the presentation is to provide an overview of the code requirements and provide guidance on code compliance, including alternate methods, design considerations and resource assistance for the design community.

Mark Campion is a policy analyst for the Oregon Building Codes Division. He is the primary contact person for COMCheck compliance software and is well versed in the compliance requirements.

Special Event

Time: 
Mar 5 2011 - 7:00am - 4:00pm
Meeting Title: 

Blower Door Test

Location: 

Between Quimby and Raleigh and 13th and 14th.

Presenters: 

Marty Houston, AIA

Description: 

Walsh Construction will be administering a whole building blower door test between 7 AM and 4 PM on Saturday. The building is located between Quimby and Raleigh and 13th and 14th. Please check in at the job trailer on Raleigh between 13th and 14th. If you wish to volunteer, please contact Marty Houston directly @ 503-572-4709.

March 2011 Monthly Meeting

Time: 
Mar 1 2011 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Meeting Title: 

Wood-Framed Walls Research

Location: 

University of Oregon-Portland
White Stag Building
70 NW Couch, Room 142/144

Presenters: 

Marty Houston, AIA

Description: 

This month’s presentation is a summary of a research study conducted by Walsh Construction Company and Building Science Corporation to evaluate highly insulated wood-framed walls for the Pacific Northwest. With changing energy codes, the 2030 Challenge and the need to reduce energy consumption, design teams and owners are considering exterior wall assemblies with ever-increasing amounts of insulation. The study evaluated exterior wall assemblies that provide a high insulating value while acknowledging the hygrothermal implications of increasing the insulating value. A series of walls was examined for overall performance factors including cost, material use, insulating value, constructability and durability.

Martin Houston, AIA, is the Quality Director for Walsh Construction Co. (WCC) in Portland, Oregon. He has a B.Arch. degree from the University of Cincinnati, holds a California architect’s license, is a LEED Accredited Professional and is trained in Building Science Thermography. With WCC since 2006, Martin’s focus includes ensuring overall building quality while concentrating on high performance envelopes and emerging technologies for building envelope commissioning and diagnosis.